Figure 1 Lipid-coated gold nanorods used to study transfection efficacy of HSP promoters

Cancer Therapy Employing Lipid-coated Gold Nanorod

By Rideeta Raquib ’19 Gene regulation induced by light has potential for noninvasive control over the function of target cells. One such method involves the delivery of photothermal heaters and heat shock protein (HSP) promoter-driven protein expression vectors into the cells and then illuminating them to activate the cells. HSP promoters are controlled by heat shock factor, which is a transcription factor in the cytosol … Continue reading Cancer Therapy Employing Lipid-coated Gold Nanorod

Figure 1 A protein involved in malaria development identified

Novel Findings to Tackle Malaria

By Rideeta Raquib ’19 Malaria is a deadly disease caused by single-celled parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Once the body is infected, sporozoites migrate to the liver and replicate to merozoites. A sporozoite in a motile, sporelike phase during a parasite’s asexual reproduction. A merozoite is the growth stage, which occurs in the bloodstream. The toxins released by merozoites destroy red blood cells and can … Continue reading Novel Findings to Tackle Malaria

Figure 1. Pleocytosis (shown here) is an increased cell count — particularly an increase in white blood cell (WBC) count — in a bodily fluid such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

Neutrophilic Pleocytosis is Connected to Viral CNS Infections

By Caleb Sooknanan ’20 Viral central nervous system (CNS) infections are often associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytic pleocytosis, or an increase in the fluid’s white blood cell count. However, these infections are also connected to neutrophilic pleocytosis, an increase in the fluid’s neutrophil count. The clinical and prognostic significance of CSF neutrophilic pleocytosis remains unknown in patients. Doctor Siraya Jaijakul and researchers at the … Continue reading Neutrophilic Pleocytosis is Connected to Viral CNS Infections

Capsule Robots Can Be Used for Biosensor Implantation

By Caleb Sooknanan ’20 Biosensors have become increasingly practical within the medical field, as they can detect different biometrics such as heart rate and body temperature levels. However, current biosensors can wear out quickly and elicit health problems such as trauma. Many efforts — especially in the area of capsule robotics — have been made to develop biosensors that are noninvasive and effective at monitoring … Continue reading Capsule Robots Can Be Used for Biosensor Implantation

Figure 1. Research now suggests that fungi, after being genetically engineered to produce spider and scorpion toxins, could help eliminate malaria-carrying mosquitoes.

Arthropod Toxins Used to Engineer Mosquito-Killing Fungi

By Caleb Sooknanan ’20 Mosquitoes are known to transmit potent diseases — particularly malaria and dengue fever — among humans. The impact of these diseases is most apparent in sub-Saharan Africa, where over 200 million cases of malaria are reported annually. Many disease control programs in the region have used broad-spectrum insecticides to eliminate mosquitoes and reduce the spread of vector-borne diseases. However, malarial mosquitoes … Continue reading Arthropod Toxins Used to Engineer Mosquito-Killing Fungi

Caption: Gray matter is a crucial component of the human nervous system, and the location of synaptic connections. This is where thoughts are formed.

Perinatally acquired HIV associated with lower regional grey matter volume

Aaradhana Natarajan, 2020 The Human Immunodeficiency Virus, commonly called HIV, is one of the most widespread immune disorders across the globe. It weakens the immune system by reducing lymphocyte count and increasing susceptibility to other diseases. While it is most commonly known for its transmissibility, it is also possible for HIV-positive pregnant women to pass on the infection to their offspring. This form of HIV … Continue reading Perinatally acquired HIV associated with lower regional grey matter volume

Figure 1: Type 1 IFN protein.

Determining a Mechanism for Nervous System Lupus

By Anna Tarasova ’19 Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an uncommon but debilitating autoimmune disease that is accompanied by psychiatric and neurological symptoms in 75% of cases. SLE with these neuropsychiatric symptoms that include depression, anxiety, and seizures is known as CNS lupus. The mechanism behind CNS lupus has long been a mystery. Dr. Allison Bialas and her team analyzed SLE progression in a lupus-prone … Continue reading Determining a Mechanism for Nervous System Lupus

Figure 1: Fetus at 9-10 weeks estimated gestational age (EGA)

New Discoveries in Fetal Immune Response Capacity

By Anna Tarasova ’19 The immune system of a fetus differs significantly from that of an infant or adult. During the second trimester of pregnancy, a fetus’s immune system is able to recognize antigens, or foreign cells, and conduct an immune response using dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells (APC), which means that they place antigens along with specific receptors on their cell surface … Continue reading New Discoveries in Fetal Immune Response Capacity

Figure 1: Infant teeth were used as biomarkers to analyse metal exposure and its connection to autism.

Infant Teeth Reveal Metal Exposure Correlates with Autism

By Rideeta Raquib Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a classification of developmental disabilities characterized by changes in social communication, as well as repetitive and restricted patterns of behavior or interests. Approximately 50 percent of ASD risk is linked to genetics and the rest is attributed to environmental factors, including fetal or early childhood exposure to toxic metals and nutrient deficiencies. Researchers from The Senator … Continue reading Infant Teeth Reveal Metal Exposure Correlates with Autism

Figure 1: A form of immunotherapy has the potential to stop allergic reactions.

Therapeutic Technique Inactivating Allergic Response

By Rideeta Raquib Allergic reactions are common issues caused by the dysregulation of Th2 cells responses towards allergens. Normally, Th2 CD4+ T cells produce cytokines in response to allergens, and cause chronic inflammation and mucus hypersecretion, among other symptoms. Although genetics does play a role, allergic diseases, such as asthma, occur after sensitization and effector/memory T cell differentiation has taken place. Common treatment includes avoiding … Continue reading Therapeutic Technique Inactivating Allergic Response