A Novel Approach to Treating Psychopathy Associated with Huntington’s Disease.

By Snigdha Kanadibhotla ‘21 Characterized by uncontrollable and spastic movements, Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that is estimated to affect about 1 in 10,000 people in the United States (1). HD has pervasive effects that damage neurons in brain regions associated with mobility, emotion, and intellectual capacity leading to symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and difficulty learning. Despite its complex and varied … Continue reading A Novel Approach to Treating Psychopathy Associated with Huntington’s Disease.

Findings of Disease for Contact-Lens Users

By Mariam Malik ‘22 Out of the individuals you know, it is often difficult to determine whether or not they wear contact lenses. Due to their efficiency, contacts have become a phenomenon in eye care and vision. A new study from the University College of London has resulted in the awareness of Acanthamoeba keratitis infections, a disease that affects the cornea and causes it to … Continue reading Findings of Disease for Contact-Lens Users

Dietary carbohydrates linked to osteoarthritis

By Nita Wong ‘21 Osteoarthritis (OA), the most widespread form of arthritis and disability in the United States, affects an estimated 27 million Americans. A condition that occurs due to the breakdown of the cartilage that cushions bones in joints – resulting in the bones rubbing against each other – OA most commonly affects joints in the hands, knees, hips, and spine. Several factors can … Continue reading Dietary carbohydrates linked to osteoarthritis

New Technology Optimizes Process for T-Cell Therapy

Rachel Kogan ‘19 T-Cells are cells involved in a particular form of immunity known as the cell-mediated immune response. The cell-mediate immune response does not utilize antibodies, or proteins that bind to and flag foreign substances as dangerous, and instead signals other cells to either engulf of attack these invaders. Typically, T-cells have been used therapeutically to treat certain forms of cancers as well as … Continue reading New Technology Optimizes Process for T-Cell Therapy

Novel Structural Details of Opioid Receptor Identified

Rachel Kogan ‘19 Opioid addiction has been on the rise for decades across the nation. Often times, these addictions are spurred by an initial pain medication prescription administered by health professionals. As a result, the health care field finds itself at a crossroads between administering the medication to aid individuals in living a pain-free life and potentially propagating addictive behaviors. Most pain medications affect the … Continue reading Novel Structural Details of Opioid Receptor Identified

Invasive Hogweed Spreads Throughout North East

Rachel Kogan ‘19 Many plant species that are accidentally transported from one continent to the other by humans become invasive species. The Giant Hogweed, Heracleum mantegazzianum,is one such species. The plant, originally found in the Caucasus Mountains in central Asia, has recently spread throughout Canada and the United States’ Northeastern region. Recently, scientists discovered the hogweed in Virginia, following reports of unusual burns associated with … Continue reading Invasive Hogweed Spreads Throughout North East

Consumption of Artificially Sweetened Beverages Linked to Lower Risk of Colon Cancer

Nita Wong ‘21 While the consumption of low- and no-calorie soft drinks has long been associated with a number of diseases including obesity and diabetes, such purported health risks have yet to be scientifically or clinically documented. In fact, a recent study conducted at Yale University’s Cancer Center has shown that such artificially sweetened products actually help colon cancer survivors avoid cancer recurrence and death. … Continue reading Consumption of Artificially Sweetened Beverages Linked to Lower Risk of Colon Cancer

Consumption of whole dairy products not linked to cardiovascular disease

Nita Wong ‘21 Whole milk, yogurt, cheese, and other full-fat dairy products have long been associated with health risks due to their saturated fat content. Nonetheless, a recent study conducted by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition was unable to find a significant link between dairy fats and increased risk of heart … Continue reading Consumption of whole dairy products not linked to cardiovascular disease

New Wasp Species Discovered in Amazon

Rachel Kogan ’19 DThe Amazon Rainforest spans much of northern South America and is largely considered to be one of the most bio diverse regions on the planet. The ecological diversity in the transitional region between the rainforest and the Andes Mountains in particular has fascinated many scientists for decades. Recently, researchers have uncovered a novel wasp species with unique anatomical features inhabiting this area. … Continue reading New Wasp Species Discovered in Amazon

Air Pollution: A Potential Contributor To Diabetes

Rachel Kogan ’19 Despite efforts to diminish industrial contamination, air pollution remains a prominent issue throughout most of the world. This form of pollution has long been associated with the rise of respiratory tract illnesses such as asthma and lung cancer. However, a recent study, conducted by a team of researchers lead by Al-Aly Ziyad of the Department of Medicine at Washington University in St. … Continue reading Air Pollution: A Potential Contributor To Diabetes

Traveling Waves in the Cortex May Hold the Key to Understanding Human Cognition

Rachel Kogan ’19 “Neurons that fire together, wire together.” This age old phrase serves as the foundation for neuroscience, commenting not only on neuron synchronicity, but also proposing a biological scaffold for behavior and thought. The greater the number of oscillating electrical impulses, or brain waves, fired by a group of neurons, the stronger the signal and potential for action. In the past few years, … Continue reading Traveling Waves in the Cortex May Hold the Key to Understanding Human Cognition

Investigating Genetic Variation and Selection in Starfish Species Piaster ochraceus

Stephanie Budhan ’21 Extreme environmental disturbances, such as a natural disaster or epidemics, dramatically impact animal population survival. These events have the potential to eliminate entire species, and affect the gene pool or the frequency of certain genes within the population. However, scientists observing these natural disasters and their subsequent effects can be difficult due to their sporadic occurrence. A study conducted by Dr. Lauren … Continue reading Investigating Genetic Variation and Selection in Starfish Species Piaster ochraceus