How Obesity May Age Your Brain

by Julia Newman (’19) Previous studies have all proven that obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and even multiple types of cancer, but only now have scientists determined one dangerous effect of obesity on the brain. Dr. Lisa Ronan and Dr. Konrad Wagstyl, researchers of the Brain Mapping Unit at the University of Cambridge, recorded the brain structures of subjects from twenty to … Continue reading How Obesity May Age Your Brain

The Cardiotoxic Effects of Oil on Fish Embryos

by Julia Newman (’19) Recent oil spills in the North Atlantic are currently causing detrimental effects not only on the water’s safety for humans, but also on the millions of fish species that live there. One species in particular, the Atlantic haddock, has shown a decreased survival correlated with the oil spills. This is a concern for both the ecosystems the fish are a part … Continue reading The Cardiotoxic Effects of Oil on Fish Embryos

Thumb-Suckers Develop Less Allergies

by Julia Newman (’19) According to the popular Hygiene Hypothesis, if a child is exposed to bacteria and other microbes early in life, he will be more resistant to various bacterial illnesses. In order to test this premise, Stephanie Lynch of the American Board of Pediatrics and Malcolm Sears of the Department of Respirology at McMaster University conducted a study on thumb-sucking and nail-biting in … Continue reading Thumb-Suckers Develop Less Allergies

Predicting Your Child’s Likelihood to Succeed

by Julia Newman (’19) The Journal of Molecular Psychiatry recently published research that suggests a factor of predictability in children’s educational achievement. Previous studies have assumed that variances among children’s school performances may be explained by one large difference in their genetic makeup, but Dr. Selzam and his team of researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience in London found that it is … Continue reading Predicting Your Child’s Likelihood to Succeed

Employment May Aid Schizophrenics

by Julia Newman (’19) At the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in Poland, Dr. Charzynska and his team of researchers conducted a study in order to determine the effect of employment on schizophrenic patients and found some promising results. Although schizophrenia itself currently has no cure, there are both medicinal and therapeutic forms of relief for the symptoms associated with the disorder. Thus, in this … Continue reading Employment May Aid Schizophrenics

The Many Advantages of Almonds

by Julia Newman (’19) Oilseeds are incredibly valuable in our society because they are applicable to a wide array of industries. Currently, soybeans, sunflowers, and rapeseeds are the most commonly used plants for their oils due to their high nutritional value, ability to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, and large quantity of oil extracted per plant. However, it was recently discovered by Dr. Sorkheh … Continue reading The Many Advantages of Almonds

The Impact of Climate on Crime Rates

by Julia Newman (’19) Previous data has shown that overall levels of aggression increase as you move closer to the equator, with Central America showing a murder rate over twenty people greater than that in European countries, but a definitive reasoning has yet to be found. Scientists have suggested that high temperatures cause increased heart rate and blood pressure leading to anger; others have pointed … Continue reading The Impact of Climate on Crime Rates

The Health Benefits of Coffee

by Julia Newman (’19) Despite the common conception that coffee can be unhealthy, many research studies show that drinking coffee in moderate amounts may benefit your body in the long run for reasons scientists are mostly unaware of. Coffee has been shown to greatly help in preventing type 2 diabetes, liver disorders, and even Parkinson’s disease. In addition, it tends to have no effect on … Continue reading The Health Benefits of Coffee

New Vaccines Are Stronger Than Ever

by Julia Newman (’19) A vaccine developed by a new technique at the University of Buffalo in New York has capabilities beyond any previously created vaccine. These new vaccines, unlike their predecessors, have both natural bacterial and man-made polymer components, which allow them to have multiple mechanisms for the delivery of antigens within the vaccine. They can now be delivered not only actively, as they … Continue reading New Vaccines Are Stronger Than Ever

A Possible Link Between Childhood Obesity and Intellectual Disorders

by Julia Newman (’19) According to a study recently published in the Disability and Health Journal, children with an intellectual disability (ID) are nearly twice as likely to develop obesity as those without ID. The researchers recorded weekly behaviors of children aged ten to seventeen years old, such as the frequency of family meals and exercise. The results displayed that children with ID ate consistent … Continue reading A Possible Link Between Childhood Obesity and Intellectual Disorders