Bacteriophages as Therapeutic Targets in the Alleviation of Alcoholic Liver Disease Symptoms

Simran Kaur ‘20 The acute form of alcohol-induced liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis, has a high mortality rate, and therapy is insufficiently effective. It is known to be promoted by gut microbiota. Cytolysin, a cell-destroying substance secreted by Enterococcus faecalis, is a major cause of hepatocyte apoptosis, consequent liver injury, and progression of hepatic disease. Patients diagnosed with alcohol-dependence present with significantly higher concentrations of E. … Continue reading Bacteriophages as Therapeutic Targets in the Alleviation of Alcoholic Liver Disease Symptoms

Disturbances in Circadian Clock Linked to Increased Susceptibility of Brain Tumors

Simran Kaur ‘20 All living organisms have circadian rhythms, an approximately twenty-four cycle that ensures the appropriate timing of important physiological functions such as digestion and sleep. Glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) that are involved in the formation of aggressive brain tumors are stimulated by altered circadian clocks. Clock genes are responsible for the oscillation of gene expression within the day and can behave as both … Continue reading Disturbances in Circadian Clock Linked to Increased Susceptibility of Brain Tumors

Engineered T-cells as a Target for Fibrosis in Myocardial Disease

Simran Kaur ‘20 Fibrosis, the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix by fibroblasts into cardiac tissue, is a significant process in the development of cardiac disease and subsequent cardiac failure, but there are not many clinical treatments that can effectively target it. Cardiac fibroblasts express an antigen that can be targeted by the transplantation of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells because CD8+ T-cells are involved in the inflammatory … Continue reading Engineered T-cells as a Target for Fibrosis in Myocardial Disease

CRISPR-Edited Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer in Immunocompromised Individuals

Simran Kaur ‘20 CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been used to edit the mammalian genome for decades, allowing scientists to remove, add, and change sections of DNA sequences. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not have a cure that exists, but studies have shown that allogeneic transplantation of STEM cells into diagnosed patients can eradicate the virus. CCR5 is the coreceptor for the entry of HIV into … Continue reading CRISPR-Edited Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer in Immunocompromised Individuals

Glutamate Receptor GLR-3 Encodes for Evolutionary Cold-Sensing Receptor

Simran Kaur ’20 The capacity to detect cold temperatures is essential for many living organisms because cold temperatures can cause detrimental effects like severe soft-tissue damage and hypothermia. Some organisms have evolved the presence of thermoreceptors, which are specific nerve endings that are sensitive to changes in temperature and exist in the skin, skeletal muscle, and the hypothalamus. Thermoreceptors relay electrical signals to the central … Continue reading Glutamate Receptor GLR-3 Encodes for Evolutionary Cold-Sensing Receptor

Role of Mitochondrial Gene TFAM in The Progression of Renal Disease

Simran Kaur ‘20 Kidney fibrosis, the accumulation of excess tissue, is the last pathway in end-stage renal failure. Examination of kidneys afflicted with renal disease in both animal and human models has shown a defect in the function of mitochondria. Mitochondria are responsible for the production of energy (ATP) in the cell, funding the processes of toxic waste removal from the blood and the regulation … Continue reading Role of Mitochondrial Gene TFAM in The Progression of Renal Disease