Association Between Gluten Uptake in Pregnant Mothers and Children

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 Type 1 diabetes is a very common disease often occurring in childhood, with highest rates in the Nordic countries. Type 1 diabetes occurs after a destruction of pancreatic beta cells which leads to lifelong dependence on insulin treatment. There are both genetic and nongenetic factors for playing a role in the aetiology of the disease. Gluten has been hypothesized to be an … Continue reading Association Between Gluten Uptake in Pregnant Mothers and Children

A Low-Carb Diet Can Increase Brain Stability in Individuals.

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 A study on neuroimaging led by Stony Brook professor Lilianne R. Mujica-Parodi reveals that neurobiological changes that are associated with aging can also be seen at a much younger age than expected. The study suggests that the effects of the changes can be prevented or reversed based on changes in diet that involve minimizing the consumption of carbohydrates. The research team at … Continue reading A Low-Carb Diet Can Increase Brain Stability in Individuals.

Can a Reduction in Carbohydrate Consumption Produce Adverse Effects?

Jorge Pincay ’20 Low carbohydrate  diets (LCD) have been adopted by many patients as a means of battling diseases such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, and many other metabolic disorders. This type of diet is even widely used by the general population for maintaining and/or losing weight. However, not many studies  have investigated the adverse health effects that may result from a sudden halt in carbohydrates … Continue reading Can a Reduction in Carbohydrate Consumption Produce Adverse Effects?

Sugary Drinks Increase Risk of Cancer

Ellie Teng ‘21 Added sugars were long known to have adverse health benefits, but sugary drinks were recently found to be linked to cancer. An increase in the consumption of sugary drinks the past decade is associated with the increase in obesity, which is a risk factor for various cancers. In France, a group of researchers assessed the connection between  the consumption of sugary drinks … Continue reading Sugary Drinks Increase Risk of Cancer

Correlation Between the Mediterranean Diet and age-related Macular Degeneration

By Mariam Malik ‘22 The human eye’s abilities are often taken granted. Currently, roughly 1.8 million Americans are affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), one of the leading causes of blindness. AMD directly affects the eye’s central vision, which is vital in individuals’ abilities to see faces and read. Researchers from the European Union have collected and analyzed data that links the Mediterranean Diet to … Continue reading Correlation Between the Mediterranean Diet and age-related Macular Degeneration

Mediterranean Diets and SGA

By Ellie Teng ‘21 Known for its appealing and delectable taste, the Mediterranean diet is very rich in nutrients. Olive oil, a main component of the Mediterranean diet, benefits the human health when consumed directly or indirectly, and is the main source of healthy fat in the diet. This study tests the effects of olive oil on small for gestational age infants (SGA). Infants who … Continue reading Mediterranean Diets and SGA

Clinical study confirms another benefit of eating crickets

By Nita Wong ‘21 While crickets are not a staple in the average American diet, more than 2 billion people around the world regularly consume insects, which are known to be rich in protein, vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. A recent study conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and published in the journal Scientific Reports is adding the increased growth … Continue reading Clinical study confirms another benefit of eating crickets

New study links consumption of soy to decreased risk of osteoporosis

By Nita Wong ‘21 Previous research has demonstrated a direct relationship between the lack of estrogen during menopause and postmenopause and the development of osteoporosis, a bone disease that results from an imbalance between the formation of new bone and the resorption of old bone. A recent study conducted at the University of Missouri suggests that an increased dietary intake of soy may be capable … Continue reading New study links consumption of soy to decreased risk of osteoporosis

Dietary carbohydrates linked to osteoarthritis

By Nita Wong ‘21 Osteoarthritis (OA), the most widespread form of arthritis and disability in the United States, affects an estimated 27 million Americans. A condition that occurs due to the breakdown of the cartilage that cushions bones in joints – resulting in the bones rubbing against each other – OA most commonly affects joints in the hands, knees, hips, and spine. Several factors can … Continue reading Dietary carbohydrates linked to osteoarthritis

Caffeine – An Ineffective Weight-loss Aid

Nita Wong ‘21 The average American consumes eight ounces of coffee on a daily basis. Caffeine, the active ingredient in coffee, has been rumoured to stimulate the release of brain chemicals that suppress appetite and facilitate weight loss by increasing metabolic rate. A recent study conducted by the Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences at the SUNY University of Buffalo, however, suggests otherwise. Under the … Continue reading Caffeine – An Ineffective Weight-loss Aid

Mediterranean-type diet may reduce effects of osteoporosis

Nita Wong ‘21 Characterized by high consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts, unrefined cereals, olive oil, and fish, the Mediterranean diet is known for its myriad of health benefits: previous research suggests that adherence to such eating habits improves cholesterol and blood sugar levels, reduces risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, prevents heart disease and strokes, and protects against type two diabetes. A recent study conducted … Continue reading Mediterranean-type diet may reduce effects of osteoporosis

Multivitamins show no cardiovascular health benefits

Nita Wong ‘21 Up to 30 percent of Americans take multivitamin and mineral supplements; in fact, the global nutritional supplement industry is projected to reach $278 billion within the next six years. A recent study conducted by the Department of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and published by the American Heart Association, however, found no link between consumption of such dietary … Continue reading Multivitamins show no cardiovascular health benefits