Role of Mitochondrial Gene TFAM in The Progression of Renal Disease

Simran Kaur ‘20 Kidney fibrosis, the accumulation of excess tissue, is the last pathway in end-stage renal failure. Examination of kidneys afflicted with renal disease in both animal and human models has shown a defect in the function of mitochondria. Mitochondria are responsible for the production of energy (ATP) in the cell, funding the processes of toxic waste removal from the blood and the regulation … Continue reading Role of Mitochondrial Gene TFAM in The Progression of Renal Disease

Bat-Plant Mutualism in Brazil’s Cerrado and Efficiency in Conservation Efforts

Fatin Chowdhury ‘20 A group of researchers based in Europe and Brazil have detailed their literature-based simulation study of mutualistic bat and plant relationships in an area of Brazil called the Cerrado, with an emphasis on efficient conservation. This environment is a neotropical savanna biome characterized by high fauna diversity and distinct habitats, ranging from grasslands to dense gallery forests. These savannas are noted for … Continue reading Bat-Plant Mutualism in Brazil’s Cerrado and Efficiency in Conservation Efforts

Environment Dependent Dietary Adjustment by Invasive Aquatic Species

Fatin Chowdhury ‘20 Recently, researchers at three Brazilian universities examined patterns of feeding behavior displayed by the Knodus moenkhausii fish invasive to Brazil. The researchers described a two-fold hypothesis. Firstly, the species is expected to be non-specialist and opportunistic, feeding on whatever food source is most readily accessible. Secondly, resource abundance affects the nature of the trophic niche it resides in. Accordingly, flexibility in diet … Continue reading Environment Dependent Dietary Adjustment by Invasive Aquatic Species

Comparing Nicotine Absorption During E-cigarette Use and Combustible Cigarette Use

 Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 Thanks to multiple ad campaigns and public awareness efforts, it is now known that cigarette use among people of all ages and health levels is highly dangerous and heightens one’s risk of contracting serious diseases such as lung cancer. Used as a preventative measure, e-cigarettes have been touted as an aid to quit using cigarettes as they are said to deliver similar … Continue reading Comparing Nicotine Absorption During E-cigarette Use and Combustible Cigarette Use

HIV Successfully Removed from Animal Genomes

Ellie Teng ‘21 The human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) is responsible for infecting millions worldwide. Currently, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being used to slow HIV progression; however, as soon as this treatment is stopped, HIV-1 is reactivated and progresses to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The reactivation of HIV-1 following the cessation of ART is as a result of the virus’ ability to integrate its … Continue reading HIV Successfully Removed from Animal Genomes

SBYIR Journal Theme Announcement

SBYIR’s Fall 2019 journal theme is… “The very big and the very small; science at the macroscopic and microscopic level” You are free to write about any scientific topic of your choosing as long as it relates to the journal theme. Don’t be afraid to think outside the box! Some sample topic ideas include astronomy, particle science, cell biology, dinosaurs, etc. In addition, links are … Continue reading SBYIR Journal Theme Announcement

New Targeted Therapy May Prevent and Reverse Food Allergies

Nicole Zhao ’20 A food allergy is an immune system reaction that occurs when exposed to a certain food (1). Symptoms resulting from an allergic reaction include digestive problems, hives, swollen airways and even anaphylaxis (1). Anaphylaxis is a serious, life-threatening allergic reaction and encompasses a variety of symptoms with high severity (2). During an allergic reaction, the immune system recognizes that a specific food … Continue reading New Targeted Therapy May Prevent and Reverse Food Allergies

Cancer Cell Debris Generated by the Longstanding Chemotherapeutic 5-Fluorouracil is Linked to Oncogenic Inflammation

Shrey Thaker ‘22 The centerpiece of clinical struggle against cancer is the recurrence of the tumor following extensive chemotherapy. The most common chemotherapeutic agent dispatched to patients suffering from colon cancer is known as 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and its main mechanism of action includes inducing apoptosis by inflicting DNA damage and triggering the cell’s natural apoptotic pathways. While the initial effect of tumor cell death is … Continue reading Cancer Cell Debris Generated by the Longstanding Chemotherapeutic 5-Fluorouracil is Linked to Oncogenic Inflammation

Pectus Excavatum: Comparing Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Computed Tomography

Nomrota Majumder ‘21 Pectus Excavatum (PE) is a structural deformity of the anterior thoracic wall, located along the thoracic artery, and causes the breastbone to essentially sink into the chest. As the most common thoracic wall deformity in children, this condition is often congenital and worsens during the adolescent growth years. In addition to the phenotypic difference associated with this connective tissue disease, other symptoms … Continue reading Pectus Excavatum: Comparing Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Computed Tomography

Researchers Discover Sub-Neptune Sized Planet

By Mariam Malik ‘22 A planet is a celestial body that rotates around a star in an elliptical orbit. Separate from fixed stars, each planet has its own unique motion. New and combined research from multiple universities around the world shows the discovery of a new planet, NGTS-4b, which is smaller than Neptune but found in an area where most Neptune-like planets are not found, … Continue reading Researchers Discover Sub-Neptune Sized Planet