The Role of Shamiri Intervention in Fostering Mindsets in Kenyan Adolescents

Thumyat Noe ’23 Adolescent depression and anxiety are prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, due to lack of mental health resources and social stigma surrounding mental illness, youths suffering from depression and anxiety often do not receive treatment. As such, it is important to improve the psychological well-being of these youths. One possible solution is to use theory-driven treatments called wise interventions, which draw on one’s … Continue reading The Role of Shamiri Intervention in Fostering Mindsets in Kenyan Adolescents

Mentorship for Freshman STEM Students Can Improve Mental Health and Academic Success

Ayesha Azeem ’23 The fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) have seen an influx of demand over the past few years, with not enough STEM graduates to meet society’s needs. This insufficiency is especially prominent in underrepresented groups in STEM, like women, African Americans, and Latinx. A key contributing factor to the shortage of STEM workers is the difficulty in retaining college students … Continue reading Mentorship for Freshman STEM Students Can Improve Mental Health and Academic Success

The Role of Affective Cognitive Processing in our Emotional Wellbeing

Daphne Siozios ’23 Affective control is regarded as the ability to regulate emotions while attending to goal-oriented information. In other words, it is the capacity to respond to certain cognitive stimuli while experiencing the feeling of an underlying emotional state. Adolescents tend to undergo greater difficulty eliciting emotional responses due to affective experiences which may be hard to manage. It can be said that this … Continue reading The Role of Affective Cognitive Processing in our Emotional Wellbeing

The Music We Enjoy Can Ease Our Pain… Literally

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 Music-induced analgesia (MIA) is defined as the ability of music to influence pain perception. The analgesic properties of music have been extensively studied in laboratory experiments and been found to alleviate pain and reduce anxiety. However, it is unclear what type of music is best for music-induced analgesia. The music used to study the phenomenon of MIA in previous studies was chosen … Continue reading The Music We Enjoy Can Ease Our Pain… Literally

Our Attachment Styles Can Be an Indicator for Anxiety

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 Anxiety is one of the most prevalent diagnosed mental illnesses in the world as well as one of the leading causes of poor health and increased mortality across all mental disorders. Thus, researching and learning about the contributing factors and etiology of anxiety is very important for many clinical psychologists like Dr. Kristen Bernard at Stony Brook University, who seeks to study … Continue reading Our Attachment Styles Can Be an Indicator for Anxiety

To Hide A Body

Wendy Wu ’22 From podcasts to documentaries, the world has an odd fascination with violent crime. Even decades after they occur, grisly murders are picked apart by the media and public. Another group with particular interest in murders are forensic psychologists. Their research has delved into the psyche of murderers and the factors that lead up to them committing crime. This has helped in developing … Continue reading To Hide A Body

Visual processing in adults with dyslexia is determined by duration of fixation periods

Joyce Chen ’23 Our fascinating ability to read is often overlooked and taken for granted. Reading requires a high level of cooperation between the eyes and the brain. The eyes are immediately able to formulate words and meanings out of the letter combinations by pausing over the text. This pause is a vital part of reading. Dyslexia is a condition in which individuals have difficulty … Continue reading Visual processing in adults with dyslexia is determined by duration of fixation periods

Priming of long-term memory from initial experience alters future learning

Joyce Chen ’23 One of the most fascinating things about the brain is its malleability. When humans learn, whether it be in the classroom or from an experience, the brain produces new neurons so that the information can be recalled in the future. This is a process known as neuronal plasticity. Although there is plenty of research surrounding this area, there is still much more … Continue reading Priming of long-term memory from initial experience alters future learning

Differences of Cognitive Offloading Usage among Individuals Performing Short Term Memory Tasks

Sooraj Shah ’24 Recalling a lot of information at one time is possible, but not feasible. Writing information down on a paper during a class or in the grocery store, for instance, are ways to reduce the strain of memorization within an individual. This concept is further defined as cognitive offloading, which can assist in overcoming the cognitive restraints in mentally retaining information. A study … Continue reading Differences of Cognitive Offloading Usage among Individuals Performing Short Term Memory Tasks

Bilinguals’ Ease of Lexical Access Related to the Switching of Languages

Sooraj Shah ’24 Over 43% of the United States population is bilingual and speaks more than one language. A skill fostered at a young age, bilingual speakers can converse and switch freely between multiple languages, but the root cause of why and when this occurs is not clear. A study conducted in Spain in collaboration with Stony Brook University’s Psychology Department explored the relationship between … Continue reading Bilinguals’ Ease of Lexical Access Related to the Switching of Languages

Visual cues aid in perceiving accented speech

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Previous research has shown that lip reading helps understand difficult speech. However, little research has been conducted on the role of visual information in perceiving accented speech, a type of difficult speech. Communication between native and nonnative English speakers is very common, especially on university campuses. There often exists a language barrier between native students and international students or instructors or teaching … Continue reading Visual cues aid in perceiving accented speech

Lower reaction levels in mothers to their child result in insensitive parenting

Joyce Chen ’23 A mother’s greatest task is to provide a nurturing environment for her child to grow, blossom, and thrive in. The absence of maternal love in a child’s life will cause a strain on the bond between the mother and her child. These neglectful mothers, also known as high-risk mothers, have insensitive reactions to their children’s needs. They rarely respond to their children’s … Continue reading Lower reaction levels in mothers to their child result in insensitive parenting