Child anxiety disorders and symptoms closely associated with specific maternal anxiety disorders

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most prevalent and disabling anxiety disorders with an onset age of 13 years. SAD is a chronic disorder with adverse psychiatric, social, and educational outcomes, which is why it is important to prevent it by understanding its risk factors. One known risk factor is behavioral inhibition (BI), the withdrawal from unfamiliar situations, environments, and … Continue reading Child anxiety disorders and symptoms closely associated with specific maternal anxiety disorders

The Impact of Pubertal Development on Anxiety Risk and Startle Habituation

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 As children begin pubertal development, they experience a host of changes that may contribute to feelings of anxiety, including increases in weight and height, changes in body shape, and hormonal fluctuations. In a study done in part by Felicia Jackson of the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University, researchers examined the relationship between mean startle, startle habituation, pubertal development, behavioral inhibition … Continue reading The Impact of Pubertal Development on Anxiety Risk and Startle Habituation

The importance of first impressions

Joyce Chen ’23 When it comes to meeting someone new, a first impression is especially significant. Naturally, humans want to create an everlasting effect or influence on others from their very first impression; However, there are several drawbacks, one of which being dominance. A study conducted by Laura Clark at the University of Lincoln aims to investigate the judgments of people based on the facial … Continue reading The importance of first impressions

Depressive symptoms can lead to a false perception of ambiguity

Joyce Chen ‘23 Unlikely to experience optimism, many depressed individuals often times perceive ambiguity in a negative fashion. Their perception of reality is morphed by their emotions and they misunderstand other people’s intentions due to their subjective feelings. They have a negatively biased interpretation of the world, thereby leading to self-doubt and isolation. Thus, a depressed disposition can cause and worsen negative ambiguity processing.  A … Continue reading Depressive symptoms can lead to a false perception of ambiguity

Better sleep quality in college students leads to better performance in classes

Joyce Chen ‘23 College students are known for being sleep-deprived, sometimes sleeping for less than four hours a day or none at all. However, a lack of sleep can result in serious health consequences, such as a weakened immune system that makes people prone to illnesses. Recent research shows that sleep can improve concentration, energy, and mental and physical health in general.  To explore this … Continue reading Better sleep quality in college students leads to better performance in classes

Increased Levels of Gray Matter in the Brain May Lead to Psychopathic Qualities

Joyce Chen ’23 Psychopathy is a genetic mutation in the brain that causes individuals to have egotistical tendencies. Such tendencies can lead to unwarranted actions such as crime or even murder, as psychopaths do not keep the wellbeing of others in mind. However, some psychopaths are capable of keeping their dark thoughts hidden very well, thereby having seemingly socially acceptable behavior. Recently, researchers from the … Continue reading Increased Levels of Gray Matter in the Brain May Lead to Psychopathic Qualities

Augmented Reality Games and Physical Activity: Exploring the Effect of Pokémon Go

Raymond Cheung ‘22 When Pokemon GO was released in 2016, the world was captivated by the ability to capture Pokemon in the real world through augmented reality. An interesting consequence of the game’s popularity is that it promotes physical activity in its players. A recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Tokyo found that the game positively impacted the physical activity in older … Continue reading Augmented Reality Games and Physical Activity: Exploring the Effect of Pokémon Go

The link between symptoms of depression in children and involvement in sports

By Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 Depression is an issue that is rapidly becoming more and more common in modern day society, even among preadolescents. Many studies have been conducted that show a correlation between a dip in depressive symptoms with an increase in physical activity, yet such an effect had not been measured in those below the ages of 9 to 11. In this study conducted … Continue reading The link between symptoms of depression in children and involvement in sports

Sleep Deprivation and Performance

By Raymond Cheung ‘22 Sleep is a necessity that many do not get enough of on a daily basis. Sleep deprivation can significantly impair cognitive function, which can prove dangerous and costly for intensive jobs. While the adverse effects of sleep deprivation on performance are not new, a recent study by Michelle E. Stepan and researchers from Michigan State University employed a large controlled sample … Continue reading Sleep Deprivation and Performance

Horses Can Integrate Senses to Detect Human Emotion

Caleb Sooknanan ‘20 Horses can cross-modally, or with multiple senses simultaneously, distinguish human facial expressions and recognize people with whom they are acquainted. While horses may be able to cross-modally distinguish human emotions, more research is needed to understand these animals’ cognitive abilities. Doctor Toshizaku Hasegawa and researchers from Hokkaido University in Japan conducted a study in which the expectancy violation method — normally used … Continue reading Horses Can Integrate Senses to Detect Human Emotion

Intelligence in the HTT Gene

By Daniel Walocha ‘19 Huntington’s Disease is caused by a trinucleotide repeat of the HTT gene. The wild type has a repeat ranging from 10 to 35, but beyond 39 repeats causes the disease characterized by significant impairments in the basal ganglia and neurodegeneration. The CAG repeats in the HTT gene cause the production of an abnormally long Huntington protein, which impairs the function of … Continue reading Intelligence in the HTT Gene

Reciprocity and International Cooperation

By: Gene Yang ‘19 Reciprocity, the act of responding to kind actions with other kind actions, has been known to stabilize cooperation within populations and communities. When applied on a global scale, models of international cooperation have shown reciprocity to be a key factor in stabilization. However, empirical research to verify these models have so far been limited to small-scale studies involving two or three … Continue reading Reciprocity and International Cooperation